Welcome to The NEXT

2D & 3D, Algorithmic, Animated, Artificial Intelligence (AI), Augmented Reality (AR), Codework, Combinatory, Generative, Glitch, Hypermedia, Immersive, Interactive, Kinetic, Locative, Mobile, Multimedia, Networked, Virtual Reality (VR), Virtual World, Web-Based/Net—these are some of the qualities found among the 41 collections of digital art and writing at The NEXT.

Envisioned as a combination museum, library, and preservation space, The NEXT maintains and makes its archives accessible for the next generation and responds to the growing need for open-access, travel-free cultural and research experiences for today's public and scholars.

Read the Curatorial Statement
FEATURED COLLECTION

The Marjorie C. Luesebrink Collection

Visit The Marjorie C. Luesebrink Collection, which features 67 works from the artist's personal collection, including 27 of 30 of her own creation.

FEATURED WORK

Aleph Null by Jim Andrews

Aleph Null is a masterwork by Jim Andrews that pushes the boundaries of participation and poetics.

UPCOMING EXHIBITION

ELO (Un)conference: Access Works!

Now accepting submissions for accessible works to be featured in the conference exhibition taking place January 17-20, 2024. Submissions are open through December 1st.

Browse Collections by Category

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Individual Artists & Scholars

Discover the work of individual artists and scholars from around the world donated to The NEXT

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Online Journals

View works published in online experimental journals from 1995 to the present

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Anthologies

Explore the exciting works published in the Electronic Literature Collections

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Showcases

Engage with curated selections of born-digital media featuring literature and net art

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Scholarly Publications

Study the many scholarly publications held in The NEXT

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ELO Archives

Celebrate the origins of the Electronic Literature Organization through its historical media