Extended eLectronic Metadata Schema (ELMS)

Title

Entity Role IDs

Description

Languages

Version IDs

Original Publication Month

Original Publication Year

Original Publication Type

Original Publisher

Original Publisher Authority

Journal Volume

Journal Issue

Media Format Type

Software Dependencies

Formal Aspects

Mechanism(s)

Literary Qualities

Procedural Modality(ies)

Accessibility

Rights Notice

Notes

Image Thumbnail

Gallery Images

Copy IDs

Copy Images

Provenance

Original URL

Download Link

Highlight

Collection ID

Collection Name

Collection Description

Collection Image

Collection Video Link

Collection Type

Collection Provenance

Start Year Collected

End Year Collected

Responsibility

Entity Name

Name Authority

Entity Type

Entity Nationality

Role

Role Abbreivation

Primary

Entity IDs

URL

Alt Text

Work ID

Copy Publication Month

Copy Publication Year

Copy Publication Type

Copy Publisher

Copy Publisher Authority

To provide a common understanding of the kind of data found in its various collections, The NEXT has adopted the Metadata Object Description Schema (MODS) maintained by the Network Development and MARC Standards Office of the Library of Congress. Because the works it collects includes a wide variety of genres—such as hypertext novels, poetry, and essays; kinetic poetry; animated text; interactive fiction; net art; literary games; virtual and augmented reality narratives; interactive novels; and mobile narratives, to name a few, the bulk of which are available and permitted for free download in their original formats or in forms that have been migrated and emulated, it is important that visitors know the computer, software, and peripheral specifications of the works they wish to access. Equally important, visitors with disabilities need to know the physical requirements of the item in order for them to prepare for the experience via accessibility tools or other methods.

To address this specificity needed for the materials it has collected, The NEXT has adopted the taxonomies developed by the Consortium on Electronic Literature (CELL)—a global, scholarly federation founded by the Electronic Literature Organization of 11 organizations that include the Electronic Literature Lab (U.S.), Ciberia (Spain), NT2 (Canada), Po-ex (Portugal), ELMCIP (Norway), Brown Digital Repository (U.S.), and others that develop and share taxonomies needed for born-digital literature and other forms of digital media. These taxonomies are organized into four categories: format, procedural modalities, mechanism(s), and multimedia elements. The NEXT has expressed them into the MODS framework, thereby extending MODS to include these important technological descriptions central to born-digital literature. Calling this new framework ELMS (Extended eLectronic Metadata Schema), The NEXT also intends to extend MODS to address areas of description helpful for visitors with disabilities, collaborating with experts in disability justice to fine tune and test the descriptions of the requirements related to disabled visitors. By doing so, it is hoped that visitors will better know the computer, software, and peripheral specifications of the works they wish to access, and, equally important, visitors with disabilities will know the physical requirements of the item in order to prepare for the experience via accessibility tools or other methods. Such crucial descriptions of archival materials should be included in the metadata.